Mothers’ rights at work

What happens when you take your employer to a tribunal?

Yesterday, we gave you a rundown on what to expect at work during your pregancy from first to second, to third trimester. Today, we’ll be looking at what to do if your employer turns nasty during your pregnancy.

Making a decision to take your employer to a tribunal won’t have been easy. However, if you don’t do something about it, they get away with it and will likely do it again. Every wonan has the right to be treated fairly at work – pregnancy can be stressful enough if you have health issues; and there’s so much you may already have on your mind in prepapration for your bundle of joy anyway, so havig issues at work just compounds the issue.

The one thing working mothers don’t often think about when deciding to go back to work

Making a decision about if, when and how to return to work after having a baby is one fraught with complexity and is utterly personal. It is certainly a topic that lots of people feel strongly about, but each family has to make its own decision about what is right for them, and there is lots to consider. Suzanne Todd, head of family law at Withers Worldwide (and a working mum herself!), provides a comment piece on the stories behind recent stats on the number of working mums.

That time I was harassed at work

Every other news story this past month seems to be about the inappropriate behaviour of men in sectors from film (aka the alleged Harvey Weinstein) to politics. Industry big wigs seem to have, for years, got away with treating women any way they wish.

Some critics have blamed women for dressing inappropriately, not standing up for themselves and even for putting themselves in a vulnerable situation themselves.

new year,new approach to being a working mum

New year: your new approach to being a working mum

Do you feel like you have to constantly prove yourself in the workplace because you’re a working mum? With most of us having a few days off because of the Christmas and bank holidays, this is your chance to go back to work renewed and ready to stand firm!

We don’t ask to be treated like martyrs, or for a medal, neither do we ask for special treatment, just because we have children. Most of us working mums just want to get on – by that I mean getting on with the work we’re being paid to do. Most of us want to get in with that work without feeling as though every step we take in the workplace is being scrutinised in case any semblance of life outside it is impacting on our work or how we do it.

Should women get leave for period pains?

On my drive this morning, listening to LBC Radio in the car, I heard an interesting feature asking listeners if they think that women should get a day off for period pains. My initial response was complete shock: isn’t it enough that maternity leave, emergency childcare and just plain old annual leave can raise eyebrows when you’re a working mum, but period pain leave? Really?

Kate Middleton’s pregnancy news spreads like wildfire. But do working mums have to tell their employer they are expecting?

When royal wives like The Duchess of Cambridge and celebrities are pregnant they are so closely monitored by the press and paparazzi that they don’t always get to break the news themselves.

Kate Middleton, wife of Prince William is a case in point, and the news that she is pregnant hit the news headlines before even the Queen knew, apparently!

5 ways working mums with new babies can get more sleep when you return to work

The joy of a new baby is certainly special and something that all new parents experience. However, not getting enough sleep is also part of having a new baby and new parents notoriously get very little sleep, if any at all.

For new mums on maternity leave, it can be gruelling enough, but if you’re self-employed or have to go back to work before your child is sleeping through the night it can be tough.