Pregnancy is often a pleasant surprise. Of course, there are times when finding out that you’re pregnant can come as a shock. Although most unplanned pregnancies are still pleasant surprises, it doesn’t make the situation any easier… There are steps you can take to make an unplanned pregnancy a pleasant experience.

Speak with a friend or family member you can trust
You’ll need someone who will be supportive and not condescending – especially if you’re a single mum-to-be. It’s already an emotional time for you, so the last thing you need is the added stress of defending the pregnancy.

Prepare yourself for the varying responses of other people
You may get receptions that are congratulatory, and you may get some who are judgmental… sadly, that’s to be expected of a working women – some people just don’t know how to react in the workplace so be prepared for both good and bad receptions.

Also, remember that what’s done is done. It’s not constructive to look back in regret, anger, or despair. It’s much better for you and your growing baby to look forward and to make the best of the surprise situation.

Don’t feel as if you’re alone
Unplanned pregnancies happen to many people. There are support groups online and offline available to help you through this confusing time in your life. Seek their counsel and speak to your GP if you start to feel anxious or depressed about the impending birth. Don’t be afraid to voice your own fears and concerns to your spouse or partner, too, even if you have different opinions.

Tell the father
Obviously, it won’t be easy, and you’ll get a varying range of responses from excitement to denial… it’s not uncommon for some men to cry, too! Hopefully, the father will be supportive and can help you through the pregnancy. If it becomes obvious that you’ll be going it alone, don’t despair – draw on your support network early on so you don’t feel sad and isolated.

Prepare for the changes in your body
Because you’re now pregnant, your body is flooded with hormones and is transforming every day. Take this into account when talking with people and prioritising your life. Those things you thought you’d be doing in six or nine months time may have to be rescheduled for when you’ve had your baby.

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